Blog

8 Tips on Feeding a Fussy Baby

As a parent, there’s enough to be thinking about without having your baby as a fussy eater thrown into the mix. Unfortunately, though, babies being fussy eaters isn’t uncommon and it’s something that a lot of parents have to adapt to.

You might be at your wits-end with your little one rejecting nearly everything that you present to them, but there are some useful tips and tricks to employ that might just help you to overcome the hurdle. Take a look at this guide for 8 tips on feeding a fussy baby:

Read more…

How to Prevent Flat Head in Babies

Flat head syndrome affects 1 in 25 babies in the UK and can occur due to a number of reasons. The prevalence of flat head in babies has increased over the past few decades following the very successful advice that baby’s should be put on their back to sleep, to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDs). This advice is still important and should always be followed, but flat head in babies can be an unwanted side effect of this positioning. To try and avoid this from developing, check out this guide and find out how to prevent flat head syndrome.

Read more…

Flat Head Syndrome and the Nature vs. Nurture Debate

Is Flat Head Syndrome Genetic?

Is Flat Head Genetic?

Flat head syndrome is usually attributed to external pressures on the skull. Consistently resting the head in the same position while sleeping, sitting and playing can eventually cause a flat spot to emerge in babies. Flattening can also begin to occur before or during birth, often as a result of breech position or crowding in the womb, or when forceps are used during an assisted birth. But, is flat head syndrome genetic to some degree, or is it caused exclusively by these external pressures on the skull? Read more…

Mum and baby with TiMbandTrying to decide whether to give your baby plagiocephaly treatment with or without a helmet is by no means an easy task. Conflicting attitudes and opinions from GPs, HVs, the press, private clinics and other parents can often serve to heighten the anxiety – no matter how honourable the intentions behind their advice might be. Read more…

Mini Directory of Plagiocephaly Advice and Support Websites

Best Places to Get Plagiocephaly Advice and Support

Having a baby with flat head syndrome can feel rather overwhelming at times. While the condition is not proven to have a negative effect on development, it can still be distressing for parents who, naturally, want what is best for their little ones. But you are not alone. In the UK, plagiocephaly affects around half of all babies under the age of one to some degree.

No matter what stage of the plagiocephaly journey you and your family are at, there are several fantastic resources out there which you can turn to for plagiocephaly support. Whether you wish to share your experiences with other parents or seek advice on plagiocephaly from the experts, this mini directory will help you find the right places to go in times of need.
Read more…

How Long Does it Take to Correct Plagiocephaly?

Plagiocephaly is a complex condition that affects each baby differently. The length of time needed for correction varies between individuals, but this can usually be predicted by a few factors. This post uncovers all and will help you to find out how long it takes to correct plagiocephaly.

Read more…

How to Treat a Baby’s Heat Rash

A heat rash, often called prickly heat, can occur in anyone but is particularly common in newborns and infants. Heat rash appears as tiny red bumps surrounded by redness on the skin, and the rash can be quite itchy so watch out for possible scratching. Although not painful, heat rashes can be uncomfortable for an infant and can cause some distress depending on the severity of it. Heat rashes often occur in the folds of a baby’s skin and on parts of the body where there is excessive sweating which can’t be evaporated away due to excess clothing, nappies or over heated moist environments. Because of this, babies sometimes also experience a heat rash if wearing a hat or the TiMband.

Read more…

The truth about pillows for flat head syndrome

Pillow for flat head syndrome - do plagiocephaly pillows work?The incidence of flat head syndrome has soared since the Back to Sleep (AKA Safe to Sleep) campaign, and increasingly, parents have been looking for new ways to prevent and correct the condition. Plagiocephaly pillows are often used by parents to prevent flat head syndrome. As constant pressure on a hard surface is what causes flat head syndrome, these pillows mold to the shape of the head instead of pressing against it. Pillows for flat head syndrome are one of the cheapest and most readily available options, but do they actually work (and crucially, are they safe)? Read more…

When Does a Baby’s Soft Spot Close?

Babies are born with flexible skulls that allow them to pass through the birth canal. At birth, the four upper plates in the skull and the single one at the back, known as the occipital bone, are connected by flexible ligaments called sutures. These allow the head to grow as the brain grows inside, which it does rapidly in early life. At the ‘corners’ of the bones, where three or more meet, there is a more open area called a fontanelle, otherwise known as a soft spot.  Most people know about the one at the central front of the head, the anterior fontanelle, but there are actually six in the upper part of the head when the baby is born. Two on each side at the lower part of the skull, one at the back above the occipital bone, and the one that most people know about, the anterior fontanelle at the top front.

Read more…

5 Things About Your Newborn’s Head that are Completely Normal

The new found sense of responsibility that comes with parenthood can be slightly overwhelming as you suddenly realise that you are responsible for a new little human! This, alongside the around-the-clock feedings and lack of sleep, means that you are extra vigilant of ANYTHING that seems out of the ordinary. When it comes to your new-born’s head, there are a few things you may be unsure of, but more often than not they’re nothing to worry about and are normal things that you simply didn’t expect.

Read more…