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How Long Does it Take to Correct Plagiocephaly?

Plagiocephaly is a complex condition that affects each baby differently. The length of time needed for correction varies between individuals, but this can usually be predicted by a few factors. This post uncovers all and will help you to find out how long it takes to correct plagiocephaly.

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How to Treat a Baby’s Heat Rash

A heat rash, often called prickly heat, can occur in anyone but is particularly common in newborns and infants. Heat rash appears as tiny red bumps surrounded by redness on the skin, and the rash can be quite itchy so watch out for possible scratching. Although not painful, heat rashes can be uncomfortable for an infant and can cause some distress depending on the severity of it. Heat rashes often occur in the folds of a baby’s skin and on parts of the body where there is excessive sweating which can’t be evaporated away due to excess clothing, nappies or over heated moist environments. Because of this, babies sometimes also experience a heat rash if wearing a hat or the TiMband.

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The truth about pillows for flat head syndrome

Pillow for flat head syndrome - do plagiocephaly pillows work?The incidence of flat head syndrome has soared since the Back to Sleep (AKA Safe to Sleep) campaign, and increasingly, parents have been looking for new ways to prevent and correct the condition. Plagiocephaly pillows are often used by parents to prevent flat head syndrome. As constant pressure on a hard surface is what causes flat head syndrome, these pillows mold to the shape of the head instead of pressing against it. Pillows for flat head syndrome are one of the cheapest and most readily available options, but do they actually work (and crucially, are they safe)? Read more…

When Does a Baby’s Soft Spot Close?

Babies are born with flexible skulls that allow them to pass through the birth canal. At birth, the four upper plates in the skull and the single one at the back, known as the occipital bone, are connected by flexible ligaments called sutures. These allow the head to grow as the brain grows inside, which it does rapidly in early life. At the ‘corners’ of the bones, where three or more meet, there is a more open area called a fontanelle, otherwise known as a soft spot.  Most people know about the one at the central front of the head, the anterior fontanelle, but there are actually six in the upper part of the head when the baby is born. Two on each side at the lower part of the skull, one at the back above the occipital bone, and the one that most people know about, the anterior fontanelle at the top front.

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5 Things About Your Newborn’s Head that are Completely Normal

The new found sense of responsibility that comes with parenthood can be slightly overwhelming as you suddenly realise that you are responsible for a new little human! This, alongside the around-the-clock feedings and lack of sleep, means that you are extra vigilant of ANYTHING that seems out of the ordinary. When it comes to your new-born’s head, there are a few things you may be unsure of, but more often than not they’re nothing to worry about and are normal things that you simply didn’t expect.

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The Biggest Myths Surrounding Flat Head in Babies

As with any medical condition, there are various myths and misconceptions that develop and can confuse those seeking advice or treatment. It is normally assumed that a baby’s flat head will correct itself, but this is a misconception as flat head syndrome differs from case to case, so to does the likelihood of the misshapen head correcting itself without treatment. This post will address some of the common myths surrounding Flat Head Syndrome, to help parents decide on the next steps for their baby.

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Can Flat Head Syndrome Cause Brain Damage?

Following a diagnosis of plagiocephaly, parents often carry out extensive research online to try and understand exactly how the condition affects the brain or seek out clinical online studies to help them decide whether to treat and which treatment option will have the best results for their baby. Read more…

deformational brachycephaly head shape chart - flat head syndrome

Brachycephaly is a condition found in babies and infants and is characterised by a flattened area at the back of the skull. If your baby has brachycephaly, you will notice at around eight weeks of age that your baby’s head seems wider than expected, the ears seem to be pushed outwards. In some cases, there will be a slight bulging on the forehead and your baby might have a wide brow. The head is often high at the back and the back of the head can look totally flattened with no rounding towards the neck. Brachycephaly is a form of flat head syndrome, it can often be found in combination with plagiocephaly and is caused by lying supine for extended periods of time in a cot.

For more information on brachycephaly and the key differences and similarities the condition has with plagiocephaly, read our earlier blog post explaining what is plagiocephaly and brachycephaly and how the terms tie in with flat head syndrome. Read more…

Classifying Plagiocephaly: How is Severity Defined?

If you suspect that your baby might have positional plagiocephaly, naturally you’ll be wondering how severe the deformity is relative to other infants, and whether or not you should seek treatment. But how is plagiocephaly measured, and what system is used as a severity assessment for Plagiocephaly? Read more…

Study to investigate the behavioural, cognitive and neurological impairments associated with craniosynostosis and plagiocephaly

Craniosynostosis

In 2012, we received a piece of news regarding USA research on craniosynostosis and plagiocephaly. This article highlighted the Department of Pediatric Psychiatry at Seattle Children’s Hospital’s participation in an NIH-funded study of the neurobehavioral correlates of craniosynostosis. This craniofacial disorder is characterized by the premature fusion of two adjoining plates of the skull, which result in malformations and dysmorphology of the head in the absence of corrective surgery.

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