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View our Plagiocephaly Presentation

Even though plagiocephaly affects almost half of infants, parents are often left in the dark about repositioning and the options that are available to them for treatment. We have created a plagiocephaly presentation that aims to provide parents, carers and healthcare professionals with the basic information they need in order to correct this common condition before it becomes severe. Read more…

Can you ski with an ACL injury?ACL tears often leave sufferers with enduring weakness and instability in the knee, leading many to ask, ‘can you ski with an ACL injury?’ Given that damaged knees are far more susceptible to further injury and that skiing is a high-energy sport requiring a lot of bending, pivoting and jumping, this level of caution is justified. Read more…

Join Our Mission to Raise Awareness about Plagiocephaly Treatment

Will parents ever have access to plagiocephaly treatment on the NHS?In a recent post, we attempted to answer the question of why plagiocephaly helmets are not available on the NHS. Having explored the research published to date together with some of the many examples in the press, we were still unable to see a logical reason why parents do not have access to plagiocephaly treatment on the NHS. Read more…

Why can't you get a plagiocephaly helmet on the NHS?Since the Back to Sleep Campaign, there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of plagiocephaly, and thus demand for treatment. Increasingly, parents are looking to specially moulded helmets in order to treat the condition – only to discover that the NHS refuses to fund this kind of treatment. In fact, it is almost unheard of for parents to obtain a plagiocephaly helmet on the NHS. Read more…

How to Prevent Injury and Maximise Your Performance On the Slopes

Knee brace for winterExtreme weather conditions and bumpy, high-speed descents can place an unnatural amount of strain on the joints – especially if they have been injured previously. However, with the right knee brace for winter sports, you can protect weakened ligaments, cartilage and bone against these external forces and benefit from increased control, stability and endurance whilst out on the slopes. Read more…

Is Flat Head Syndrome Genetic?

September 3, 2014

Flat Head Syndrome and the Nature vs. Nurture Debate

Is flat head syndrome genetic?Flat head syndrome is usually attributed to external pressures on the skull. Consistently resting the head in the same position while sleeping, sitting and playing can eventually cause a flat spot to emerge. Flattening can also begin to occur before or during birth, often as a result of breech position or crowding in the womb, or when forceps are used during an assisted birth. But is flat head syndrome genetic to some degree, or is it caused exclusively by these external pressures on the skull? Read more…

How effective are helmets for plagiocephaly?There has been some controversy in recent years regarding the treatment of deformational plagiocephaly (DP). Standard NHS advice is that it corrects itself given the correct conditions, but this notion is disputed by many Orthotists and paediatricians, who argue that this is not always the case. They maintain that, where the deformity is severe, an orthotic helmet is sometimes required in order to correct it. But is there any evidence to back up this claim? Are there cases in which the condition fails to correct itself, and if so, how effective are helmets for plagiocephaly? Read more…

Should you be worried about flat head syndromeLooking after your baby can be an emotional rollercoaster. As a parent you want your little one to be as happy and healthy as possible, so noticing something out of the ordinary, such as a flat spot on the head, is bound to be a bit of a shock. You probably have a multitude of questions running through your head, such as: should I worry about flat head syndrome? Does it affect child development? Do I need to do anything about it? Read more…

Mini Directory of Plagiocephaly Advice and Support Websites

Plagiocephaly advice and supportHaving a baby with a flat head can be rather overwhelming at times. While the condition is not proven to have a negative effect on development, it can still be distressing for parents who, naturally, want what is best for their little ones. But you’re not alone in all this. Plagiocephaly is much more common than you might have thought, affecting almost half of babies, and there are many fantastic resources out there that you can turn to for plagiocephaly advice and support. Read more…

What to do if your baby has torticollisTorticollis (also known as wry neck) is a very common condition, often seen in babies who have developed plagiocephaly. It is characterised by an inability to turn the head fully in both directions, and there may also be a head tilt towards the affected muscle. As the muscle is tight and cramped this may be painful for your baby, who could also be quite irritable. Adults often wake up with a stiff neck in the morning, known as acute torticollis, but this tends to resolve itself fairly quickly. However, congenital torticollis (that which is present at birth) requires active treatment. This post explains what to do if your baby has torticollis, helping prevent the face and skull from growing unevenly, and improving the range of motion of the head and neck. Read more…