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Trying to decide whether to give your baby plagiocephaly treatment with or without a helmet is by no means an easy task. Conflicting attitudes and opinions from GPs, HVs, the press, private clinics and other parents can often serve to heighten the anxiety – no matter how honourable the intentions behind their advice might be. (more…)

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The Truth About Pillows for Flat Head Syndrome

The incidence of flat head syndrome has soared since the Back to Sleep (AKA Safe to Sleep) campaign, and increasingly, parents have been looking for new ways to prevent and correct the condition. Plagiocephaly pillows are often used by parents to prevent flat head syndrome. As constant pressure on a hard surface is what causes flat head syndrome, these pillows mold to the shape of the head instead of pressing against it. Pillows for flat head syndrome are one of the cheapest and most readily available options, but do they actually work (and crucially, are they safe)? (more…)

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It’s not uncommon for babies to be diagnosed with both plagiocephaly and torticollis. The relationship between plagiocephaly and torticollis is slightly unusual as causality can go in either direction. In other words, sometimes plagiocephaly can cause torticollis and sometimes it’s the other way round. Keep reading for a more in-depth explanation of the relationship between plagiocephaly and torticollis!

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Torticollis (also known as wry neck) is a very common condition which can often develop into plagiocephaly. It is characterised by an inability to turn the head fully in both directions, and there may also be a head tilt towards the affected muscle.

As the muscles tighten and become cramped, pain and discomfort will often be felt, causing your baby to become irritable. In infancy, torticollis can develop in a number of ways. Firstly, newborns can experience torticollis due to maintaining a specific position in the womb or after a difficult childbirth. Acquired torticollis happens shortly after birth, either as a result of some shortening from the position that the baby has been lying in or due to bruising during the birth. However your baby has acquired torticollis, seeking a professional diagnosis and pursuing active treatment is necessary.

This informative blog post explains what to do if your baby has torticollis, helping to prevent the face and skull from growing unevenly, and improving the range of motion of the head and neck of your baby.

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Plagiocephaly can start to appear before or during birth but often takes a few weeks to become apparent. A parent or health professional may notice that the head has an altered shape with a flattening to the side or at the back. If this is severe, the face and forehead may also be asymmetrical, with one ear further forward than the other. There are many different factors that can cause Plagiocephaly in babies, and they all relate to the fact that infants are born with soft, malleable skulls.  (more…)

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Parents are often left in the dark about treatment options that are available Plagiocephaly. To help, we’ve created a plagiocephaly presentation that aims to provide parents, carers and healthcare professionals with the basic information they need to correct this common condition before it becomes severe. As well as this, providing a detailed summary of the presentation.

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Baby Head Shapes: What’s Normal and What Isn’t?

Many of the parents who come to see us are anxious about the shapes of their babies’ heads. We are often asked things like ‘what should a baby’s head look like?’ and ‘how severe a flattening is too severe?’, so we thought we might put a few minds at rest by answering some of these questions here. (more…)