Tag Archives: plagiocephaly

The Relationship between Plagiocephaly and Torticollis

It’s not uncommon for babies to be diagnosed with both plagiocephaly and torticollis. The relationship between plagiocephaly and torticollis is slightly unusual as causality can go in either direction. In other words, sometimes plagiocephaly can cause torticollis and sometimes it’s the other way round.

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will plagiocephaly return after treatment?

When weighing up the pros and cons of plagiocephaly helmet treatment, many parents ask us whether there is a risk of the condition returning once it has been corrected. We have also found that some parents whose babies are reaching the end of their treatment are also wondering this. However, we’re pleased to reassure parents that plagiocephaly will not return after helmet treatment.

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What Causes Plagiocephaly?

Plagiocephaly can start to appear before or during birth but often takes a few weeks to become apparent. A parent or health professional may notice that the head has an altered shape with a flattening to the side or at the back. If this is severe, the face and forehead may also be asymmetrical, with one ear further forward than the other. (more…)

Classifying Plagiocephaly: How is Severity Defined?

If you suspect that your baby might have positional plagiocephaly, naturally you’ll be wondering how severe the deformity is relative to other infants, and whether or not you should seek treatment. But how is plagiocephaly measured, and what system is used as a severity assessment for Plagiocephaly? (more…)

Cleaning Your Baby’s Helmet to Minimise Odours and Itching

Baby with TiMband Helmet

On our Facebook page, parents often ask for advice on how to clean a plagiocephaly helmet, particularly during the summer.

While a plagiocephaly helmet is a safe form of treatment with no detrimental effect on cranial growth, it can often start to get a bit smelly. People who have to wear a helmet for work or use a cast for a broken bone find the same and it is perfectly natural. The odour is caused by sweat and natural skin oils, and so is especially common in babies with long hair and during the warmer months of the year. Some babies can also experience minor sweat rash or redness on the scalp.

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Parents are often left in the dark about treatment options that are available to them for Plagiocephaly. We have created a plagiocephaly presentation that aims to provide parents, carers and healthcare professionals with the basic information they need in order to correct this common condition before it becomes severe. As well as this, providing a detailed summary of the presentation.

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Do Baby Carriers and Car Seats Cause Flat Head Syndrome?

The dramatic rise in the incidence of baby flat head syndrome over the last couple of decades has largely been attributed to the Back to Sleep Campaign. Placing babies on their back to sleep is essential as a means of reducing the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), but if the baby is kept in one position, it can put continual pressure on the back of the head, which can eventually cause a flat spot to emerge.

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How does plagiocephaly affect the head and face?

Plagiocephaly is predominantly identified by a flattening either at the back or to either side of the skull. As a direct result of this flattening, facial features can become misaligned and other issues may develop. The facial features subject to the most change include the eyes and the ears. As such, facial asymmetry is also regarded as a good indication of plagiocephaly.

Do cranial helmets influence ear position in babies with plagiocephaly?

Helmet therapy

In 2012, a paper was published in the Journal of Craniofacial Surgery exploring whether or not helmet therapy, such as TiMband treatment, influences the ear position in babies with positional plagiocephaly.

This is a question that we are often asked but it’s a difficult one to answer, as the changes can be so subtle.

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Most new born babies have misshapen heads at birth and in the majority of cases this will self-correct in the first few weeks of their life. However, there are a number of reasons why a baby may continue to have a misshapen head or for a misshapen head to develop. It is important to recognise what is considered a normal head shape and the options available for babies who develop a flattening in early infancy.

This blog posts explores the causes of a misshapen head and how long it takes for a baby’s head shape to fully develop to ensure you have all the information you need when finding the right treatment for your baby.

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Study to investigate the behavioural, cognitive and neurological impairments associated with craniosynostosis and plagiocephaly

Craniosynostosis

In 2012, we received a piece of news regarding USA research on craniosynostosis and plagiocephaly. This article highlighted the Department of Pediatric Psychiatry at Seattle Children’s Hospital’s participation in an NIH-funded study of the neurobehavioral correlates of craniosynostosis. This craniofacial disorder is characterized by the premature fusion of two adjoining plates of the skull, which result in malformations and dysmorphology of the head in the absence of corrective surgery.

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