plagiocephaly

A baby can catch an illness at almost any age and any time of year and a baby’s first cold can often feel a little scary for parents. However, it is important to remember that colds and illnesses at an early age often build up a baby’s immunity and will help them fight infection much quicker in future.

Nevertheless, being able to diagnose cold symptoms in young babies quickly is important to help ease discomfort and prevent illnesses developing into more serious conditions.

This blog post explores the initial signs and symptoms of a cold to look out for, simple steps to treat a baby’s cold and how this may affect plagiocephaly treatment.

 

How do I Know if my Baby has a Cold?

Symptoms of a cold are often easy to spot and are not too dissimilar to the symptoms we experience as adults. A stuffy, runny or congested nose is often the first tell-tale sign your baby may be suffering with a cold but there are a few other symptoms to be aware of. They include:

 

If your baby is currently undergoing plagiocephaly treatment and is wearing a plagiocephaly helmet for long periods of time throughout the day, you may be concerned as to how this may affect your baby if they are showing symptoms of a cold.

Please read our advice from our clinicians on how illness can affect wearing a plagiocephaly helmet which covers if and when your baby should be wearing a plagiocephaly helmet if they have a rash, high temperature or other illnesses such as chicken pox. The post also explores if less helmet wear during illnesses affects overall progress and results.

 

4 Simple Steps on Treating a Baby’s Cold

Once you have established that your baby has caught a common cold and doesn’t appear to be developing any other serious symptoms, you will naturally want to try and make your little one feel comfortable and help them to recover as soon as possible.

 

When to See a Doctor

If your baby is under three months old and is showing signs of a cold, they should be seen by your local GP as a precautionary measure. Seeking medical advice will help to prevent your baby developing anything more serious and will also put your mind at ease.

A fever is another common cold symptom and is the body’s natural way of fighting off infection. However, if your baby has a fever of 39 degrees or higher or the fever is persistent for 5 days or more, you should also book an appointment with your local GP. Other symptoms to be aware of also include difficulty in breathing, severe loss of appetite and signs of dehydration. If your baby displays any of these symptoms it’s important to visit your doctor as soon as possible.

No one knows their baby better than a parent and if you are worried or concerned about any symptoms of illness your baby is showing, it is best to contact your GP for some advice. If your baby is currently undergoing plagiocephaly treatment and you are concerned if and when your baby should wear their plagiocephaly helmet during illness, contact one of our friendly and experienced clinicians who can advise you and provide you with that all important peace of mind.

plagiocephaly

Flat Head Syndrome and the Nature vs. Nurture Debate – Is Flat Head Genetic?

Flat head syndrome is usually attributed to external pressures on the skull. Consistently resting the head in the same position while sleeping, sitting and playing can eventually cause a flat spot to emerge in babies. Flattening can also begin to occur before or during birth, often as a result of breech position or crowding in the womb, or when forceps are used during an assisted birth. But, is flat head syndrome genetic to some degree, or is it caused exclusively by these external pressures on the skull?
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plagiocephaly

Trying to decide whether to give your baby plagiocephaly treatment with or without a helmet is by no means an easy task. Conflicting attitudes and opinions from GPs, HVs, the press, private clinics and other parents can often serve to heighten the anxiety – no matter how honourable the intentions behind their advice might be. (more…)

plagiocephaly

Mini Directory of Plagiocephaly Advice and Support Websites

Having a baby with flat head syndrome can feel rather overwhelming at times. While the condition is not proven to have a negative effect on development, it can still be distressing for parents who, naturally, want what is best for their little ones. But you are not alone. In the UK, plagiocephaly affects around half of all babies under the age of one to some degree.

No matter what stage of the plagiocephaly journey you and your family are at, there are several fantastic resources out there which you can turn to for plagiocephaly support. Whether you wish to share your experiences with other parents or seek advice on plagiocephaly from the experts, this mini directory will help you find the right places to go in times of need.
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plagiocephaly

Plagiocephaly is a complex condition that affects each baby differently. The length of time needed for correction varies between individuals, but this can usually be predicted by a few factors. This post uncovers all and will help you to find out how long it takes to correct plagiocephaly.

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plagiocephaly

The Truth About Pillows for Flat Head Syndrome

The incidence of flat head syndrome has soared since the Back to Sleep (AKA Safe to Sleep) campaign, and increasingly, parents have been looking for new ways to prevent and correct the condition. Plagiocephaly pillows are often used by parents to prevent flat head syndrome. As constant pressure on a hard surface is what causes flat head syndrome, these pillows mold to the shape of the head instead of pressing against it. Pillows for flat head syndrome are one of the cheapest and most readily available options, but do they actually work (and crucially, are they safe)? (more…)

plagiocephaly

If you suspect that your baby might have positional plagiocephaly, naturally you’ll be wondering how severe the deformity is relative to other infants, and whether or not you should seek treatment. But how is plagiocephaly measured, and what system is used as a severity assessment for Plagiocephaly? (more…)