child development

Can Flat Head Syndrome Cause Brain Damage?

Following a diagnosis of plagiocephaly, parents often carry out extensive research online to try and understand exactly how the condition affects the brain or seek out clinical online studies to help them decide whether to treat and which treatment option will have the best results for their baby. (more…)

child development

Study to investigate the behavioural, cognitive and neurological impairments associated with craniosynostosis and plagiocephaly

In 2012, we received a piece of news regarding USA research on craniosynostosis and plagiocephaly. This article highlighted the Department of Pediatric Psychiatry at Seattle Children’s Hospital’s participation in an NIH-funded study of the neurobehavioral correlates of craniosynostosis. This craniofacial disorder is characterized by the premature fusion of two adjoining plates of the skull, which result in malformations and dysmorphology of the head in the absence of corrective surgery.

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child development

Parents are always concerned about the potential risk factors associated with helmets for flat head syndrome. Understandably, many have come to us asking “what are the risks associated with using baby helmets?” and “are they dangerous / uncomfortable / harmful to my baby’s development?” (more…)

child development

Plagiocephaly and craniosynostosis are both conditions that result in skull deformities. Because of this they are often confused, but there are a number of key features that define each one as distinct from the other. Here we outline the difference between plagiocephaly and craniosynostosis to help give you an idea of their distinguishing features.

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child development

When weighing up the pros and cons of plagiocephaly helmet treatment, many parents ask us whether there is a risk of the condition returning once it has been corrected. We have also found that some parents whose babies are reaching the end of their treatment are also wondering this. However, we’re pleased to reassure parents that plagiocephaly will not return after helmet treatment.

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child development

How does plagiocephaly affect the head and face?

Plagiocephaly is predominantly identified by a flattening either at the back or to either side of the skull. As a direct result of this flattening, facial features can become misaligned and other issues may develop. The facial features subject to the most change include the eyes and the ears. As such, facial asymmetry is also regarded as a good indication of plagiocephaly.

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child development

What is Craniosynostosis and How is it Treated?

Craniosynostosis is often confused with plagiocephaly as they are both conditions that affect the growth and shape of a baby’s head. It is, however, important to understand how to differentiate craniosynostosis as it requires a specialist form of treatment.
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