Tag Archives: brachycephaly

What Causes Plagiocephaly?

Plagiocephaly can start to appear before or during birth but often takes a few weeks to become apparent. A parent or health professional may notice that the head has an altered shape with a flattening to the side or at the back. If this is severe, the face and forehead may also be asymmetrical, with one ear further forward than the other. (more…)

Classifying Plagiocephaly: How is Severity Defined?

If you suspect that your baby might have positional plagiocephaly, naturally you’ll be wondering how severe the deformity is relative to other infants, and whether or not you should seek treatment. But how is plagiocephaly measured, and what system is used as a severity assessment for Plagiocephaly? (more…)

Cleaning Your Baby’s Helmet to Minimise Odours and Itching

Baby with TiMband Helmet

On our Facebook page, parents often ask for advice on how to clean a plagiocephaly helmet, particularly during the summer.

While a plagiocephaly helmet is a safe form of treatment with no detrimental effect on cranial growth, it can often start to get a bit smelly. People who have to wear a helmet for work or use a cast for a broken bone find the same and it is perfectly natural. The odour is caused by sweat and natural skin oils, and so is especially common in babies with long hair and during the warmer months of the year. Some babies can also experience minor sweat rash or redness on the scalp.

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Do Baby Carriers and Car Seats Cause Flat Head Syndrome?

The dramatic rise in the incidence of baby flat head syndrome over the last couple of decades has largely been attributed to the Back to Sleep Campaign. Placing babies on their back to sleep is essential as a means of reducing the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), but if the baby is kept in one position, it can put continual pressure on the back of the head, which can eventually cause a flat spot to emerge.

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Mini Directory of Plagiocephaly Advice and Support Websites

Plagiocephaly advice and support

Having a baby with flat head syndrome can feel rather overwhelming at times. While the condition is not proven to have a negative effect on development, it can still be distressing for parents who, naturally, want what is best for their little ones. But you are not alone. In the UK, plagiocephaly affects around half of all babies under the age of one to some degree.

 

No matter what stage of the plagiocephaly journey you and your family are at, there are several fantastic resources out there which you can turn to for plagiocephaly advice and support. Whether you wish to share your experiences with other parents or seek advice on plagiocephaly from the experts, this mini directory will help you find the right places to go in times of need.
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You might have been shying away from telling your friend about their baby’s misshapen head. After all, it’s ‘only’ cosmetic, it’ll probably correct itself over time and you don’t want to upset anyone. Unfortunately, this all-too-common thought process has led to many babies with flat heads being left with a permanent, lifelong deformity.

Plagiocephaly, or flat head syndrome, is an increasingly common condition characterised by a flat spot to the back or side of the head. While its precise effects on early physical, cognitive and motor development may not yet be fully understood, early research indicates that the condition may not be ‘only’ a cosmetic concern. And even if it is, how do you think your friend’s child will feel about his or her head shape in, say, 10, 15 or 20 years’ time?

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Flat Head Syndrome and the Nature vs. Nurture Debate

Is flat head syndrome genetic?Flat head syndrome is usually attributed to external pressures on the skull. Consistently resting the head in the same position while sleeping, sitting and playing can eventually cause a flat spot to emerge. Flattening can also begin to occur before or during birth, often as a result of breech position or crowding in the womb, or when forceps are used during an assisted birth. But is flat head syndrome genetic to some degree, or is it caused exclusively by these external pressures on the skull? (more…)

FAQ-img-1Plagiocephaly and Brachycephaly are two of the most common types of flat head syndrome diagnosed every year in the UK. Although the causes are the same, the two conditions describe very different head shapes and it’s important to differentiate the two in order to achieve the best results for your baby.

This blog post establishes the key differences between Plagiocephaly and Brachycephaly so you can take the next steps in finding the right treatment.

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The Link Between Flat Head Syndrome and Visual Defects

Flat head syndrome pillow

As flat head syndrome in babies has continued to rise, so too has speculation regarding a possible link between flat head syndrome and visual defects. Head shape deformities are thought to be linked to an increased likelihood of developing conditions like strabismus (eye misalignment) and anisometropia (significantly different prescriptions in the two eyes). But what is the nature of this relationship? Does flat head syndrome affect the eyes directly, or is the situation more complex?

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craniosynotosis

Plagiocephaly and craniosynostosis are both conditions that result in skull deformities. Because of this they are often confused, but there are a number of key features that define each one as distinct from the other. Here we outline the difference between plagiocephaly and craniosynostosis to help give you an idea of their distinguishing features.

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